What to expect in Wednesday’s impeachment trial session

After more than 12 hours of debate Tuesday that stretched into the early morning hours of Wednesday, the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is set to reconvene Wednesday afternoon. The Senate agreed to rules that allow each side to present their arguments, or opening statements, for 24 hours over a three-day period. The House managers, who are acting as prosecutors in the impeachment trial, will begin presenting evidence at 1 p.m. Wednesday.Here’s what you can expect from those proceedings:The House managers issued a 111-page brief to the Senate on their investigative findings that led to Trump’s impeachment. Each of the seven house managers will explain those findings during the first three days. It’s expected that they will divide that time almost evenly over the three days. Wednesday’s proceedings will likely last past 9 p.m. ET with breaks. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts showed Tuesday night that he was not going to allow House managers or the defense attorneys to break decorum rules. Expect to see all parties on a tight leash to behave appropriately during the course of the trial.

After more than 12 hours of debate Tuesday that stretched into the early morning hours of Wednesday, the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is set to reconvene Wednesday afternoon.

The Senate agreed to rules that allow each side to present their arguments, or opening statements, for 24 hours over a three-day period. The House managers, who are acting as prosecutors in the impeachment trial, will begin presenting evidence at 1 p.m. Wednesday.

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Here’s what you can expect from those proceedings:

The House managers issued a 111-page brief to the Senate on their investigative findings that led to Trump’s impeachment. Each of the seven house managers will explain those findings during the first three days. It’s expected that they will divide that time almost evenly over the three days. Wednesday’s proceedings will likely last past 9 p.m. ET with breaks.

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts showed Tuesday night that he was not going to allow House managers or the defense attorneys to break decorum rules. Expect to see all parties on a tight leash to behave appropriately during the course of the trial.