National coronavirus updates: US surpasses 4,000 deaths as number of cases near 200,000

The latest:In the United States, there are more than 189,000 cases, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. More than 4,000 people have died nationwide. President Donald Trump on Sunday extended federal social distancing guidelines until the end of April.A nationwide stay-at-home order is “pretty unlikely,” Trump says. Globally, the number of cases has surpassed 860,000 with more than 42,000 deaths, Hopkins reports.Hawaii has first coronavirus death, leaving Wyoming as sole state with no deaths Hawaii has reported its first death from the coronavirus, leaving Wyoming as the only U.S. state without a fatality from COVID-19.The Hawaii victim “was an older adult resident of Oahu” with preexisting health problems, according to Dr. Bruce Anderson with the state Department of Health.“This is a difficult time for everyone in Hawaii,” Governor David Ige said in a news conference Tuesday evening.President Trump discusses the potential need for Americans to wear masksPresident Trump discussed the need for Americans to wear masks to help stop the spread of coronavirus. Trump said that Americans “can wear scarves” in lieu of masks.“You know, you can use a scarf. A lot of people have scarfs, and you can use a scarf. A scarf would be very good. My feeling is if people want to do it, there’s certainly no harm to it. I would say do it, but use a scarf if you want, rather than going out and getting a mask or whatever, we’re making millions and millions of masks,” Trump said when asked if he would recommend all Americans wear masks.Trump said he wants the masks being produced to go to hospitals that need them.“We want them to go to the hospitals. But one of the things that Dr. Fauci told me today is we don’t want everybody competing with the hospitals where you really need them,” Trump added.Trump did say that it might not be a bad idea for Americans to use some sort of face cover, for at least a period of time.“So you can use scarves if you want, it can be something else, it does not have to be a mask, but it’s not a bad idea at least for a period of time. I mean eventually you’re not going to want to do that, you’re not going to have to do that. It’s going to be gone. It’s going to be gone, hopefully gone for a long time,” Trump said.White House projects 100,000 to 240,000 US deathsThe White House on Tuesday projected 100,000 to 240,000 deaths in the U.S. from the coronavirus pandemic if current social distancing guidelines are maintained. President Donald Trump called American efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus “a matter of life and death” and urged the public to heed his administration’s social distancing guidelines.Trump called on Americans to brace themselves for a “rough two-week period” but predicted the country would soon see a “light at the end of the tunnel” of the global catastrophe. “I want every American to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead,” Trump said. “We’re going to go through a very tough two weeks.”Infectious disease expert Dr. Tony Fauci said Americans should be prepared for 100,000 people to die. He said the country is striving to reduce it.Fauci said now is the time to step up on prevention efforts to help address that possibility.The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus has climbed past 4,000.US seeing ‘glimmers’ that social distancing is helping to curb spreadEarly clues — in places like New York, California and Seattle — indicate social distancing may be slowing the rate at which coronavirus cases otherwise would have increased in the United States.But health officials warn it’s too early to know how well it’s working — and even if mitigation measures continue, the number of U.S. deaths still could be hard to take.”We’re starting to see glimmers … just the inklings” that the daily increases in U.S. cases aren’t as steep as they would have been without social distancing, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CNN on Tuesday morning.”We’re not seeing (a turnaround) yet,” he said.More than 500 US deaths reported Monday At least 574 deaths from coronavirus in the U.S. were reported Monday and officials say the battle to defeat the virus will take cooperation from every American.”This is the whole of America approach, the cooperation we’re seeing all the way from the public, private to the interagency, to the state, local and federal part of it,” said Air Force Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, who led the effort to convert a New York convention center into a hospital to respond to a rapid increase in patients.”We have to come together as a team and that’s what we’re seeing, it’s the only way we’re going to get through this,” he said. The totals include cases from every state, the District of Columbia and several U.S. territories, as well as repatriated cases.Wyoming has not reported a death from coronavirus.As the number of cases and deaths increase, many people on the front lines of the national health care fight are feeling frustrated — and ill — amid the coronavirus outbreak. On Monday, Trump said the country was facing a “vital 30 days” ahead, during which the results of his efforts to contain the virus would become known.”Our future is in our own hands, and the choices and sacrifices we make will determine the fate of this virus and really the fate of our victory,” Trump said. Hundreds of medical workers across the country have fallen sick and hospitals face dire shortages of protective gear.”We are slowly descending into chaos,” a trauma physician at Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital said.The doctor’s colleagues who normally rely on literature, research and training are “flying blind” without instruments and building guidelines from the ground up, the physician said.And when they’re done treating coronavirus patients in trauma, they head back to the ICU to treat more.PGlmcmFtZSBpZD0iaHR2LWNvdmlkLW1hcCIgc3JjPSJodHRwczovL2NvdmlkLTE5LWFzc2V0cy5odHZ0b29scy51cy9pbmRleC5odG1sIiBzY3JvbGw9Im5vIiBzdHlsZT0iYm9yZGVyOm5vbmU7Ij48L2lmcmFtZT4= Staying in place can save millions, top doctor saysThe latest projections on coronavirus in the U.S. were so alarming, there was virtually no choice but to extend social distancing guidelines, two of the nation’s top infectious disease experts said.Federal guidelines originally scheduled to end this week have now been extended to April 30.That means all Americans should avoid groups of 10 or more people, avoid discretionary travel, and consider canceling all social visits in homes. Older residents should stay home.But even with continued social distancing, “I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw 100,000 deaths,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.”It was patently obvious, looking at the data … if we try to push back (on social distancing) prematurely, not only do we lose lives, but it probably would even hurt the economy,” he said.”So you would lose on double accounts. So to us, it was no question what the right choice was.”How well Americans obey social distancing could make the difference between 100,000 and millions of deaths, said Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator.”If we do things together well, almost perfectly, we could get in the range of 100,000 to 200,000 fatalities,” Birx told NBC’s “Today” show Monday. “We don’t even want to see that.”Birx said the worst-case projections show “between 1.6 million and 2.2 million deaths if you do nothing” and disregard social distancing guidelines.First U.S. service member dies from coronavirusThe U.S. military announced Monday the first U.S. service member died from the coronavirus.Army Capt. Douglas Linn Hickok, an Army National Guardsman from New Jersey, passed away on Saturday, according to a statement from the Department of Defense.Hickok was hospitalized since March 21, CNN reports.”Today is a sad day for the Department of Defense as we have lost our first American service member — active, reserve or Guard — to coronavirus,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said in the statement.’Stay at home, buy us time’In Washington state’s King County — the country’s first epicenter — two new reports from an institute that specializes in studying disease transmission dynamics showed social distancing measures appeared to be making a difference.”We are looking at reductions in person to person contact that have progressively improved and have led us to a point where we are making a very positive impact,” said Dr. Jeff Duchin, the public health officer for Seattle and King County.But that’s no indication to roll back any of those measures, Duchin said.”We really need to double down on the measures that appear to be working,” he said.King County wasn’t alone in its announcement.Two weeks after San Francisco issued the country’s first shelter in place order, hospital emergency rooms throughout the region may be seeing the order’s effect.”The surge we have been anticipating has not yet come,” Dr. Jahan Fahimi, an emergency physician and medical director at the University of California, San Francisco, told CNN. “We’re all kind of together holding our breaths.”In other parts of the country, walking into work feels like walking into a war zone for many medical care workers.”There is not enough of anything,” one trauma physician at Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital said. “There are just so many patients who are so sick, it seems impossible to keep up with the demand.”Inside New York City’s Elmhurst hospital, one doctor told CNN “we are at the brink of not being able to care for patients.”It may seem simple, another doctor says, but staying at home could also be saving those working to save patients.”It feels like coronavirus is everywhere and it feels like we have very little to protect ourselves from getting very sick ourselves as healthcare workers” Dr. Cornelia Griggs, a Pediatric Surgery Fellow at Columbia University said Monday. “I want everyone at home to know that even though it seems like staying at home is futile, it’s not.””We need everyone at home to hold the line, stay at home. Buy us time, flatten the curve.” W2lmcmFtZSBzcmM9Imh0dHBzOi8vZDJjbXZicTdzeHgzM2ouY2xvdWRmcm9udC5uZXQvZW1haWwvcHJvZF9jb3JvbmF2aXJ1c19pZnJhbWVfYXJ0aWNsZS5odG1sIiBoZWlnaHQ9IjQxNCIgc3R5bGU9IndpZHRoOjEwMCU7Ym9yZGVyOm5vbmU7b3ZlcmZsb3c6aGlkZGVuIiBzY3JvbGxpbmc9Im5vIiBmcmFtZWJvcmRlcj0iMCIgYWxsb3dUcmFuc3BhcmVuY3k9InRydWUiXVsvaWZyYW1lXQ==The Associated Press and CNN contributed to this report.

The latest:

  • In the United States, there are more than 189,000 cases, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. More than 4,000 people have died nationwide.
  • President Donald Trump on Sunday extended federal social distancing guidelines until the end of April.
  • A nationwide stay-at-home order is “pretty unlikely,” Trump says.
  • Globally, the number of cases has surpassed 860,000 with more than 42,000 deaths, Hopkins reports.

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Hawaii has first coronavirus death, leaving Wyoming as sole state with no deaths

Hawaii has reported its first death from the coronavirus, leaving Wyoming as the only U.S. state without a fatality from COVID-19.

The Hawaii victim “was an older adult resident of Oahu” with preexisting health problems, according to Dr. Bruce Anderson with the state Department of Health.

“This is a difficult time for everyone in Hawaii,” Governor David Ige said in a news conference Tuesday evening.

President Trump discusses the potential need for Americans to wear masks

President Trump discussed the need for Americans to wear masks to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

Trump said that Americans “can wear scarves” in lieu of masks.

“You know, you can use a scarf. A lot of people have scarfs, and you can use a scarf. A scarf would be very good. My feeling is if people want to do it, there’s certainly no harm to it. I would say do it, but use a scarf if you want, rather than going out and getting a mask or whatever, we’re making millions and millions of masks,” Trump said when asked if he would recommend all Americans wear masks.

Trump said he wants the masks being produced to go to hospitals that need them.

“We want them to go to the hospitals. But one of the things that Dr. Fauci told me today is we don’t want everybody competing with the hospitals where you really need them,” Trump added.

Trump did say that it might not be a bad idea for Americans to use some sort of face cover, for at least a period of time.

“So you can use scarves if you want, it can be something else, it does not have to be a mask, but it’s not a bad idea at least for a period of time. I mean eventually you’re not going to want to do that, you’re not going to have to do that. It’s going to be gone. It’s going to be gone, hopefully gone for a long time,” Trump said.

White House projects 100,000 to 240,000 US deaths

The White House on Tuesday projected 100,000 to 240,000 deaths in the U.S. from the coronavirus pandemic if current social distancing guidelines are maintained. President Donald Trump called American efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus “a matter of life and death” and urged the public to heed his administration’s social distancing guidelines.

Trump called on Americans to brace themselves for a “rough two-week period” but predicted the country would soon see a “light at the end of the tunnel” of the global catastrophe.

“I want every American to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead,” Trump said. “We’re going to go through a very tough two weeks.”

Infectious disease expert Dr. Tony Fauci said Americans should be prepared for 100,000 people to die. He said the country is striving to reduce it.

Fauci said now is the time to step up on prevention efforts to help address that possibility.

The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus has climbed past 4,000.

US seeing ‘glimmers’ that social distancing is helping to curb spread

Early clues — in places like New York, California and Seattle — indicate social distancing may be slowing the rate at which coronavirus cases otherwise would have increased in the United States.

But health officials warn it’s too early to know how well it’s working — and even if mitigation measures continue, the number of U.S. deaths still could be hard to take.

“We’re starting to see glimmers … just the inklings” that the daily increases in U.S. cases aren’t as steep as they would have been without social distancing, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CNN on Tuesday morning.

“We’re not seeing (a turnaround) yet,” he said.

More than 500 US deaths reported Monday

At least 574 deaths from coronavirus in the U.S. were reported Monday and officials say the battle to defeat the virus will take cooperation from every American.

“This is the whole of America approach, the cooperation we’re seeing all the way from the public, private to the interagency, to the state, local and federal part of it,” said Air Force Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, who led the effort to convert a New York convention center into a hospital to respond to a rapid increase in patients.

“We have to come together as a team and that’s what we’re seeing, it’s the only way we’re going to get through this,” he said.

The totals include cases from every state, the District of Columbia and several U.S. territories, as well as repatriated cases.

Wyoming has not reported a death from coronavirus.

As the number of cases and deaths increase, many people on the front lines of the national health care fight are feeling frustrated — and ill — amid the coronavirus outbreak.

On Monday, Trump said the country was facing a “vital 30 days” ahead, during which the results of his efforts to contain the virus would become known.

“Our future is in our own hands, and the choices and sacrifices we make will determine the fate of this virus and really the fate of our victory,” Trump said.

Hundreds of medical workers across the country have fallen sick and hospitals face dire shortages of protective gear.

“We are slowly descending into chaos,” a trauma physician at Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital said.

The doctor’s colleagues who normally rely on literature, research and training are “flying blind” without instruments and building guidelines from the ground up, the physician said.

And when they’re done treating coronavirus patients in trauma, they head back to the ICU to treat more.

Staying in place can save millions, top doctor says

The latest projections on coronavirus in the U.S. were so alarming, there was virtually no choice but to extend social distancing guidelines, two of the nation’s top infectious disease experts said.

Federal guidelines originally scheduled to end this week have now been extended to April 30.

That means all Americans should avoid groups of 10 or more people, avoid discretionary travel, and consider canceling all social visits in homes. Older residents should stay home.

But even with continued social distancing, “I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw 100,000 deaths,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

“It was patently obvious, looking at the data … if we try to push back (on social distancing) prematurely, not only do we lose lives, but it probably would even hurt the economy,” he said.

“So you would lose on double accounts. So to us, it was no question what the right choice was.”

How well Americans obey social distancing could make the difference between 100,000 and millions of deaths, said Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator.

“If we do things together well, almost perfectly, we could get in the range of 100,000 to 200,000 fatalities,” Birx told NBC’s “Today” show Monday. “We don’t even want to see that.”

Birx said the worst-case projections show “between 1.6 million and 2.2 million deaths if you do nothing” and disregard social distancing guidelines.

First U.S. service member dies from coronavirus

The U.S. military announced Monday the first U.S. service member died from the coronavirus.

Army Capt. Douglas Linn Hickok, an Army National Guardsman from New Jersey, passed away on Saturday, according to a statement from the Department of Defense.

Hickok was hospitalized since March 21, CNN reports.

“Today is a sad day for the Department of Defense as we have lost our first American service member — active, reserve or Guard — to coronavirus,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said in the statement.

‘Stay at home, buy us time’

In Washington state’s King County — the country’s first epicenter — two new reports from an institute that specializes in studying disease transmission dynamics showed social distancing measures appeared to be making a difference.

“We are looking at reductions in person to person contact that have progressively improved and have led us to a point where we are making a very positive impact,” said Dr. Jeff Duchin, the public health officer for Seattle and King County.

But that’s no indication to roll back any of those measures, Duchin said.

“We really need to double down on the measures that appear to be working,” he said.

King County wasn’t alone in its announcement.

Two weeks after San Francisco issued the country’s first shelter in place order, hospital emergency rooms throughout the region may be seeing the order’s effect.

“The surge we have been anticipating has not yet come,” Dr. Jahan Fahimi, an emergency physician and medical director at the University of California, San Francisco, told CNN. “We’re all kind of together holding our breaths.”

In other parts of the country, walking into work feels like walking into a war zone for many medical care workers.

“There is not enough of anything,” one trauma physician at Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital said. “There are just so many patients who are so sick, it seems impossible to keep up with the demand.”

Inside New York City’s Elmhurst hospital, one doctor told CNN “we are at the brink of not being able to care for patients.”

It may seem simple, another doctor says, but staying at home could also be saving those working to save patients.

“It feels like coronavirus is everywhere and it feels like we have very little to protect ourselves from getting very sick ourselves as healthcare workers” Dr. Cornelia Griggs, a Pediatric Surgery Fellow at Columbia University said Monday. “I want everyone at home to know that even though it seems like staying at home is futile, it’s not.”

“We need everyone at home to hold the line, stay at home. Buy us time, flatten the curve.”

The Associated Press and CNN contributed to this report.