Kamala Harris accepts Democrats’ historic vice presidential nomination

Kamala Harris became the first Black and South Asian woman nominated to a major party’s presidential ticket tonight.She delivered her acceptance speech as the first woman of color on a major party ticket this evening. She began her speech Wednesday night saying that her presence is “a testament to the dedication of generations before me.”Harris noted that women had earned the right to vote 100 years ago — but that Black women faced a longer battle for voting rights.”Without fanfare or recognition, they organized, testified, rallied, marched, and fought — not just for their vote, but for a seat at the table. These women and the generations that followed worked to make democracy and opportunity real in the lives of all of us who followed,” she said. “They paved the way for the trailblazing leadership of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton.”She named several female civil rights and political — “Mary Church Terrell and Mary Mcleod Bethune. Fannie Lou Hamer and Diane Nash. Constance Baker Motley and Shirley Chisholm.””We’re not often taught their stories,” she said. “But as Americans, we all stand on their shoulders.”Harris, a daughter of Indian and Jamaican immigrants, has often spoken about both their experience in America and her own as a biracial woman.

Kamala Harris became the first Black and South Asian woman nominated to a major party’s presidential ticket tonight.

She delivered her acceptance speech as the first woman of color on a major party ticket this evening. She began her speech Wednesday night saying that her presence is “a testament to the dedication of generations before me.”

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Harris noted that women had earned the right to vote 100 years ago — but that Black women faced a longer battle for voting rights.

“Without fanfare or recognition, they organized, testified, rallied, marched, and fought — not just for their vote, but for a seat at the table. These women and the generations that followed worked to make democracy and opportunity real in the lives of all of us who followed,” she said. “They paved the way for the trailblazing leadership of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton.”

She named several female civil rights and political — “Mary Church Terrell and Mary Mcleod Bethune. Fannie Lou Hamer and Diane Nash. Constance Baker Motley and Shirley Chisholm.”

“We’re not often taught their stories,” she said. “But as Americans, we all stand on their shoulders.”

Harris, a daughter of Indian and Jamaican immigrants, has often spoken about both their experience in America and her own as a biracial woman.