From Zoom calls to parking lot potlucks, people found ways to celebrate Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving typically means a lot of food and a lot of people. In a pandemic, the food is fine, but large gatherings are strongly discouraged. “We were planning on still getting together three families,” said Jamie Moorby, of Calais, Vermont. “We decided against it after the latest orders. To be honest, we were all really sad about it.” Moorby has distinct memories of past Thanksgivings, filled with dozens of family members and friends and lots of food and fun. Determined to still celebrate together, they came up with the idea divvying up the meal and delivering their shares to each other door-to-door. “Thanksgiving, a lot of it’s about sharing food and sharing community,” Moorby said. “We’re excited to find a way that we can still do all of that safely.”Similarly, Cara Sachs set up a potluck with her friends and family. “We packaged up our individual dishes, so we can just pull up, pop our trunks and shop around,” she explained. “It’s just a little bit of normalcy. Like I get to do something and share it with other people and connect. It makes it more festive.”Sachs also included those who couldn’t drive to the parking lot potluck for health reasons. She said the extra effort is worth it to include people will illness and disability. The crew seemed very happy to be together for a “Trunksgiving,” even if it was from 6-plus feet apart in an empty parking lot. Watch the video above for more.

Thanksgiving typically means a lot of food and a lot of people. In a pandemic, the food is fine, but large gatherings are strongly discouraged.

“We were planning on still getting together three families,” said Jamie Moorby, of Calais, Vermont. “We decided against it after the latest orders. To be honest, we were all really sad about it.”

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Moorby has distinct memories of past Thanksgivings, filled with dozens of family members and friends and lots of food and fun. Determined to still celebrate together, they came up with the idea divvying up the meal and delivering their shares to each other door-to-door.

“Thanksgiving, a lot of it’s about sharing food and sharing community,” Moorby said. “We’re excited to find a way that we can still do all of that safely.”

Similarly, Cara Sachs set up a potluck with her friends and family.

“We packaged up our individual dishes, so we can just pull up, pop our trunks and shop around,” she explained. “It’s just a little bit of normalcy. Like I get to do something and share it with other people and connect. It makes it more festive.”

Sachs also included those who couldn’t drive to the parking lot potluck for health reasons. She said the extra effort is worth it to include people will illness and disability.

The crew seemed very happy to be together for a “Trunksgiving,” even if it was from 6-plus feet apart in an empty parking lot.

Watch the video above for more.